Seretide

(5 customer reviews)

Seretide is a drug used to treat asthma and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Seretide is available in the form of accuhalers and evohalers. Seretide has two components: fluticasone, a corticosteroid which is an anti-inflammatory drug; and salmeterol, which is responsible for treating airways constrictions.
 
Together, these components help in treating symptoms like wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath in a patient. Note that Seretide only assists to prevent asthma attacks. It does not work during an actual asthma attack.
 

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How does Seretide work?

Seretide is a formulation of two (2) medicines: fluticasone and salmeterol. Together, these components work as a treatment for COPD or chronic obstructive lung disease.

Fluticasone is classified as a corticosteroid or simply steroid (corticosteroids are different from anabolic steroid). Corticosteroids are naturally produced by the body’s adrenal glands. Fluticasone is a synthetic type of corticosteroid which when added to the body’s natural steroids, helps in controlling inflammatory responses.

When inhaled into the lungs, fluticasone is immersed into the cells of the lungs and airways. From this point, fluticasone prevents the release of specific chemicals from the cells. These said chemicals play a vital role in the body’s immune system and are usually involved in the production of allergic and immune reactions that result in inflammation. When the discharge of these chemicals is decreased, inflammation is also reduced.

In the case of asthma, aside from the tightening of the airways due to inflammation, the obstruction of the airways can also be caused by mucus. By preventing excess mucus formation and inflammation, fluticasone helps in averting asthma attacks.

Salmeterol, on the other hand, is a type of medication referred to as a long-acting beta 2 agonist. This medication works by acting on the lungs’ receptors (referred to as beta 2 receptors). By working on these receptors, Salmeterol relaxes the airway muscles and permits the airways to open.

How do I take Seretide?

Seretide should be taken according to the doctor’s prescription. This type of medicine is for inhalation use only. It should be used daily in order to achieve its optimum benefits.

The usual inhalation of Seretide starts at a low dosage, 2 times a day, depending on the patient’s reaction to the treatment. Thereafter, the dosage is then adjusted. However, in the event that the prescribed dose is once a day, patients with nocturnal symptoms should take it in the evening while patients who have day time symptoms should take it in the morning.

Are there side effects?

Seretide has possible side effects such as:

  • Headache
  • Hoarse voice
  • Arrhythmias or the abnormal beating of the heart
  • Tachycardia (increased heart rate)
  • Tremors
  • Anxiety
  • Sleep disorders

Can I buy Seretide online?

Certainly, buying Seretide can be done easily and securely online. All you have to do is to undergo a short consultation with a doctor. Make sure that you provide all the relevant medical information. If the doctor is satisfied that you want the correct medication, he will write a prescription and send it to the pharmacy. You should receive the medication the following day.

5 reviews for Seretide

  1. ariel120

    It works well as a maintenance medicine. I take it morning and night but it doesn’t replace your emergency inhaler.
    Drugs.com Reviewed September 10, 2009

  2. Anonymous

    This is my second experience using Advair inhaler. The first time I used it, it was like a miracle. My asthma disappeared. After using the inhaler for about 1 year, my asthma returned and worsened. I visited a naturopath and was advised to change my diet. I stopped gluten, citrus, soy and dairy foods. Once again, my asthma disappeared for about a year. When it returned to the point that my rescue inhaler was being used too frequently, the Dr. recommended that I return to advair. Once again, it worked. But, here I am three months later and my asthma is worsening. What is one to do?
    Drugs.com Reviewed January 16, 2011

  3. servewithmintsauce

    NOTE: I live in the UK, where GSK calls Advair ‘Seretide’. It’s the same thing. — I struggled for control until I was given Seretide 50/25, 2 puffs twice a day, on Christmas Eve 2014. One of the best Christmas presents ever! I got a bad chest infection about 6 weeks later and had to move to Seretide 125/25, 2 puffs twice a day. Now controlled on Seretide 125/25 and Montelukast 10mg daily. Also have to use Salbutamol inhaler regularly during allergy season or when I’m ill/coming down after an allergic reaction. Prednisolone for latex allergy reaction, and Pred. prophylactic antibiotics if I’m bad.
    Drugs.com Reviewed July 23, 2015

  4. Dwm42

    For years I have been a prisoner of rescue inhailers and nebulizers. This along with absacor as a daily inhaler were not controlling my problems. Over 10 years ago my doctor put me on advair 100/50. I now have not use my rescue inhaler or any other product other than the rescue inhaler in the airport in Rome a couple of years ago as it is no where close to being smoke free.
    Drugs.com Reviewed October 22, 2016

  5. There are no nicknames left!!

    I used to take the Advair in Diskus form. I couldn’t breath in fast to get enough med so they switched me to the aerosol type Advair. This one works well for me. The thing is, some Drs do not tell you you MUST rinse your entire mouth and gargle after every use. It can cause thrush, which is awful, and voice loss, hoarseness, coughing, and mouth sores too if you leave residue within the mouth or throat. This has a corticosteroid in it so please rinse well! Avoid side effects. It will help you breath because its a beta antagonist blocker or something, which relaxes the lung muscle. Take care of your mouth! I have dentures so I must rinse even MORE but never had thrush in 9 years over it and can breath easier now.
    Drugs.com Reviewed November 15, 2017

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